• 55°

Extreme heat beating down on Troup County

Record-breaking temps recorded this week

Donny Karr

dkarr@civitasmedia.com

Members of LaGrange High School’s football team take a water break to cool off during Tuesday’s practice at Granger Park. Tuesday’s high temperature recorded at LaGrange-Callway Airport was a daily record at 101 degrees. Data collected by the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network shows that temperatures for June and July have been 22 percent hotter than normal.

http://lagrangenews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2015/08/web1_web0805Heat011.jpgMembers of LaGrange High School’s football team take a water break to cool off during Tuesday’s practice at Granger Park. Tuesday’s high temperature recorded at LaGrange-Callway Airport was a daily record at 101 degrees. Data collected by the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network shows that temperatures for June and July have been 22 percent hotter than normal.

Donny Karr | Daily News

A waterboy for the LaGrange High School football team carries water to players during Tuesday’s practice at Granger Park.

http://lagrangenews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2015/08/web1_web0805Heat021.jpgA waterboy for the LaGrange High School football team carries water to players during Tuesday’s practice at Granger Park.

Donny Karr | Daily News

Members of the Granger football team cool down during a brief water break during practice Tuesday at Granger Park. The team gathered under tents set up on the football field at Granger Park on Tuesday.

http://lagrangenews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2015/08/web1_web0805Heat031.jpgMembers of the Granger football team cool down during a brief water break during practice Tuesday at Granger Park. The team gathered under tents set up on the football field at Granger Park on Tuesday.

Donny Karr | Daily News

Along with coolers full of ice, the Granger football team makes use of specialized coolers that keep water at cold temperatures in order to keep players hydrated and help them stay cool.

http://lagrangenews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2015/08/web1_web0805Heat041.jpgAlong with coolers full of ice, the Granger football team makes use of specialized coolers that keep water at cold temperatures in order to keep players hydrated and help them stay cool.

Donny Karr | Daily News

A member of the LaGrange football team drinks water during practice Tuesday at Granger Park. While many teams across the state opted to remain indoors during the blistering heatwave, the Grangers toughed out the temperatures and held practice outside.

http://lagrangenews.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/37/2015/08/web1_web0805Heat051.jpgA member of the LaGrange football team drinks water during practice Tuesday at Granger Park. While many teams across the state opted to remain indoors during the blistering heatwave, the Grangers toughed out the temperatures and held practice outside.

Donny Karr | Daily News

LaGRANGE — People are trying to beat the heat this summer, which has shown record-breaking temperatures.

According to data collected by the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, the months of June and July were 22 percent hotter than the average.

Tuesday’s temperature at LaGrange-Callaway Airport recorded a new high of 101 for the date, passing the old record of 98 degrees that was recorded in 1957. Monday’s high of 98 tied the record for that date, which was also set in 1957.

“We’re not experiencing a major heat wave, as some people might assume,” said Dr. Shea Rose, professor of weather and climatology at the University of West Georgia. “The conditions we have experienced — lots of sunshine with little moisture — have just left us with little rain to cool off from this heat.”

Local residents will get a small break from the heat this weekend as temperatures are predicted to dip back down to the lower 90s and chances of rain, but that will be short-lived. According to the National Weather Service, Saturday’s high temperature will climb back into the mid-90s.

The Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network, or GAEMN, is a program of the University of Georgia that uses a weather monitoring stations throughout the state to measure weather activity. The program’s local outpost is at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain. Using online data available from GAEMN weather records, LaGrange City Manager Tom Hall said that the city is able to track weather patterns and how they coincide with electricity usage for the city.

“We took a look at how this summer has stacked up compared to the last couple of years, as well as the average,” said Hall. “We measure that in something called degree days, which is the average temperature throughout the day, minus 72 degrees. So, if the average temperature is 82 degrees then that equals 10 degree days.”

According to data collected by the city via the GAEMN, this weather year is 27 percent warmer than it was a year ago, and 38 percent warmer than it was two years ago.

“We’ve looked at our power supply, and we talked about the city’s generation resources, and we are very well suited to meet the high demand, which was about 110 megawatts today,” Hall said at the July 28 City Council meeting. “That’s about as high as it gets in LaGrange.”

Hall said that the heating and cooling of residences represents just about half of the occupant’s heating bill. He recommends that residents keep their thermostat around 78 degrees in order to save money, as keeping it on a lower setting will expend more electricity than is needed. He also offered advice on how residents can keep their utility bills consistent.

“A non-expensive opportunity to overcome high bills as they occur throughout different times of the year, is to get on what we call ‘balanced billing’ or ‘budget billing,’” said Hall. “When the bills do get high in the heat of the summer or the cold of winter, the bill becomes more average and more able to budget than in a typical month. A lot of times, it keeps people from getting in trouble with their bills.”

Donny Karr is a reporter at LaGrange Daily News. He may be reached at 706-884-7311, ext. 2154.