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Freedom vs. Bondage

An unknown author said, “You can choose freedom or bondage at the voting booth. Freedom comes with the risk of individual failure. Bondage does away with this challenge. But, you can freely vote for bondage only once. Elections are unnecessary afterwards.”

People have struggled with forming the best government possible for thousands of years. Below are 10 of the tenants that were adopted by a large part of the world in 1946. Take a look:

1. Abolition of private property in land and application of all rents of land to public purpose.

The courts have already interpreted the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution (1868) to give the government far more “eminent domain” power than was originally intended. Private property rights have become much diluted already.

2. A progressive or graduated income tax.

The 16th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and various state income taxes, established this major political coup in the United States many decades ago. These taxes continue to drain the lifeblood out of the American economy and greatly reduce the accumulation of desperately needed capital for future growth, business starts, job creation, and salary increases.

3. Abolition of all rights of inheritance

Another enemy of private property rights is in the form of federal & state estate taxes and other inheritance taxes, which have abolished or at least greatly diluted the right of property owners to determine the disposition and distribution of their estates upon death. Instead, the government takes a hefty portion for “the public good.”

4. Confiscation of the property of all emigrants and rebels.

If you are deemed to be a rebel or publicly dissent, the government would have the right to take all of your possessions; including guns, money, and the rest of your property.

5. Centralization of credit in the hands of the state, by means of a national bank with state capital and an exclusive monopoly.

The Federal Reserve System, created by the Federal Reserve Act of Congress in 1913, is indeed such a “national bank.” This goal has been completed.

6. Centralization of the means of communication and transportation in the hands of the state.

Amtrak and Conrail – these government-owned enterprises have operated with inefficiency in the U.S. Free-market private enterprises solutions are, at best, not welcome.

7. Extension of factories and instruments of production owned by the state; the bringing into cultivation of waste lands and the improvement of the soil generally in accordance with a common plan.

While the U.S. does not have vast “collective farms” (which failed so miserably in the Soviet Union), we nevertheless do have a significant degree of government involvement in agriculture in the form of price support subsidies and acreage allotments and land-use controls.

8. Equal obligation of all to work. Establishment of industrial armies, especially for agriculture.

We would not be free to pursue our dreams and goals. The government forces people to work in industries of its choosing; not our own.

9. Combination of agriculture with manufacturing industries; gradual abolition of the distinction between town and country by a more equable distribution of the population over the country.

This sounds benign. But, how do you move people to other areas of a country? You do it by force. The Trail of Tears is a good example.

10. Free education for all children in government schools. Abolition of children’s factory labor in its present form. Combination of education with industrial production, etc. etc.

This is the most common sense tenet of this utopian document. Who wrote these principles and unleashed armies across the globe? Karl Marx in the Communist Manifesto. Nov. 3 may be the most critical election since 1860. I encourage all of us to compare these tenants to the platforms of both parties and decide which resembles America and which represents misery and suffering.