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How to vote in Georgia’s runoff elections

A small number of ballots are yet to be counted in Georgia, but the Associated Press and other outlets have projected that both of Georgia’s U.S. Senate races are headed to a Jan. 5, 2021, runoff.

State law requires candidates to win more than 50 percent of the vote to be elected. Neither incumbent Republican Sen. David Perdue nor Democrat Jon Ossoff reached the threshold in their race as Libertarian Shane Hazel won 2.3 percent of votes.

In the crowded special election to serve out the rest of Johnny Isakson’s term, Democrat Raphael Warnock and Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler finished first and second, with 33 percent and 26 percent of the vote.

Both senate races, then, will be decided in January, which could determine control of the chamber. The Senate is projected to have at least 48 Democrats and 48 Republicans, with the two Georgia races undetermined. Races in Alaska and North Carolina have not been called, though the Republican leads in both.

Georgians will likely be bombarded with political advertisements as both parties look to control the Senate. Its partisan makeup will play a large part in determining how effective president-elect Joe Biden is in passing legislation.

There could be one more run-off as well.

One member of Georgia’s Public Service Commission, Republican Lauren “Bubba” McDonald, is also barely under the 50 percent threshold needed for election. If he stays there, McDonald will also be in a runoff with Democrat Daniel Blackman.

The PSC runoff, however, would take place Dec. 1.

The Georgia PSC regulates utilities and sets rates for Georgia Power and Atlanta Gas Light.

Troup County Elections and Registration Supervisor Andrew Harper said early voting for the PSC runoff would be Nov. 23, 24 and 25. Voters must already be registered to vote in that election, Harper said. Unregistered people can still register to vote in the January Senate run-offs, however, until Dec. 7, he said.

The senate runoff will have three weeks of early voting, starting Dec. 14 and ending Dec. 31.

Early voting hours are the same as they were in the general election — Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Early voting will be available at the Troup County Government Center. Harper isn’t yet sure if Hogansville will spend the money to operate an early voting location for the run-offs and is waiting to hear from the city.

Voters can also request and return an absentee ballot, either by mail or through one of the county’s drop boxes.

All voting precincts will be open on election day.

State law requires candidates to win more than 50 percent of the vote to be elected. Neither incumbent Republican Sen. David Perdue nor Democrat Jon Ossoff reached the threshold in their race as Libertarian Shane Hazel won 2.3 percent of votes.

In the crowded special election to serve out the rest of Johnny Isakson’s term, Democrat Raphael Warnock and Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler finished first and second, with 33 percent and 26 percent of the vote.

Both senate races, then, will be decided in January, which could determine control of the chamber. The Senate is projected to have at least 48 Democrats and 48 Republicans, with the two Georgia races undetermined. Races in Alaska and North Carolina have not been called, though the Republican leads in both.

Georgians will likely be bombarded with political advertisements as both parties look to control the Senate. Its partisan makeup will play a large part in determining how effective president-elect Joe Biden is in passing legislation.

There could be one more run-off as well.

One member of Georgia’s Public Service Commission, Republican Lauren “Bubba” McDonald, is also barely under the 50 percent threshold needed for election. If he stays there, McDonald will also be in a runoff with Democrat Daniel Blackman.

The PSC runoff, however, would take place Dec. 1.

The Georgia PSC regulates utilities and sets rates for Georgia Power and Atlanta Gas Light.

Troup County Elections and Registration Supervisor Andrew Harper said early voting for the PSC runoff would be Nov. 23, 24 and 25. Voters must already be registered to vote in that election, Harper said. Unregistered people can still register to vote in the January Senate run-offs, however, until Dec. 7, he said.

The senate runoff will have three weeks of early voting, starting Dec. 14 and ending Dec. 31.

Early voting hours are the same as they were in the general election — Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Early voting will be available at the Troup County Government Center. Harper isn’t yet sure if Hogansville will spend the money to operate an early voting location for the run-offs and is waiting to hear from the city.

Voters can also request and return an absentee ballot, either by mail or through one of the county’s drop boxes.

All voting precincts will be open on election day.