• 70°

Celebrating St. Paddy’s Day: More than 2,000 attend downtown block party

Thousands of people dressed in green celebrated St. Patrick’s Day at the downtown block party Saturday evening.

Main Street was blocked off from traffic for the fourth annual block party, which included Irish dancers and cover band Mr. Terrific.

Several couples got up from their seats and danced to the music.

The celebration was also partly held at Wild Leap Brew Co., and Smoke & Mirrors performed there starting at 8 p.m.

Some who celebrated by showing their Irish spirit, dressing in plaid kilts. Hunter Woolridge wore a Republic of Ireland flag as a cape.

“I’m originally from Scottish descent, but there’s not a Scottish holiday,” Woolridge said. “There’s an Irish holiday, so I’m rocking this out.”

In addition to performances, there were temporary tattoos for children and sidewalk chalk.

Restaurants and bars on the street participated with food and some gave out green beer.

Connie Self said it was her first time attending the block party, and she thought it was well organized.

“It’s great to see the community coming together and celebrating,” Self said.

Barbie Watts, the director of Promotions and Marketing for the Downtown LaGrange Development Authority, estimated that there were more than 2,000 people who attended the block party.

“I love that LaGrange has started doing some more fun activities,” Stephanie Varner said.

“We needed things to do here in LaGrange and [the city has] done a great job.”

Justin Ammerman and his wife Tiffany recently moved back to LaGrange from Atlanta. He said it was great because it gave the community more to do.

“Our chief fear was that we were going to have nothing to do and that we were going to be really bored because in Atlanta we just had everything at our fingertips. It’s safe, it’s fun, it’s friendly, it’s still got that awesome small-town vibe, but people want to see it grow,” Ammerman said. “And people have to realize that the small-town feel doesn’t come from what is in the town, it’s who is in the town.”

Ammerman said growing up in LaGrange, the coolest thing to do was walk around at Walmart.

“You got an entirely revitalized downtown, and it’s just like people actually care,” Ammerman said. “We still have this wonderful small-town feel, but just because you’re a small town doesn’t mean you have nothing to do.”

Main Street was blocked off from traffic for the fourth annual block party, which included Irish dancers and cover band Mr. Terrific.

Several couples got up from their seats and danced to the music.

The celebration was also partly held at Wild Leap Brew Co., and Smoke & Mirrors performed there starting at 8 p.m.

Some who celebrated by showing their Irish spirit, dressing in plaid kilts. Hunter Woolridge wore a Republic of Ireland flag as a cape.

“I’m originally from Scottish descent, but there’s not a Scottish holiday,” Woolridge said. “There’s an Irish holiday, so I’m rocking this out.”

In addition to performances, there were temporary tattoos for children and sidewalk chalk.

Restaurants and bars on the street participated with food and some gave out green beer.

Connie Self said it was her first time attending the block party, and she thought it was well organized.

“It’s great to see the community coming together and celebrating,” Self said.

Barbie Watts, the director of Promotions and Marketing for the Downtown LaGrange Development Authority, estimated that there were more than 2,000 people who attended the block party.

“I love that LaGrange has started doing some more fun activities,” Stephanie Varner said.

“We needed things to do here in LaGrange and [the city has] done a great job.”

Justin Ammerman and his wife Tiffany recently moved back to LaGrange from Atlanta. He said it was great because it gave the community more to do.

“Our chief fear was that we were going to have nothing to do and that we were going to be really bored because in Atlanta we just had everything at our fingertips. It’s safe, it’s fun, it’s friendly, it’s still got that awesome small-town vibe, but people want to see it grow,” Ammerman said. “And people have to realize that the small-town feel doesn’t come from what is in the town, it’s who is in the town.”

Ammerman said growing up in LaGrange, the coolest thing to do was walk around at Walmart.

“You got an entirely revitalized downtown, and it’s just like people actually care,” Ammerman said. “We still have this wonderful small-town feel, but just because you’re a small town doesn’t mean you have nothing to do.”